Welcome to CFTRE

The Canadian Foundation for Trauma Research & Education (CFTRE) is a registered Canadian charity created to further the understanding of the fields of neurobiology & psychophysiology, through education and research, as they pertain to the treatment of traumatic conditions. To this end, we are committed to conduct research and to train professionals in effectively treating people who suffer from symptoms of trauma and other forms of dysregulation in the autonomic nervous system.
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Upcoming Events

  • 2016 Self Regulation Therapy® Foundation Level Trainings in Kelowna; Hazelton, BC; and Iqaluit, Nunavut
    In this training, practitioners are taught practical applications of the most recent...
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  • SRT Post Advanced IV: Global Activation in Edmonton March 11 – 13, 2016
    A continuation of Advanced IV: Global Activation, this three day course will...
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News

  • Positive Effects of Kangaroo Care for Preemies
    An Israeli study by neuroscientist Ruth Feldman and her team, published in...
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  • Older Adults Show Increased Neuroplasticity from Childhood Music Lessons
    A study in the Journal of Neuroscience. [Travis White-Schwoch et al., Older...
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  • Academic Recognition for SRT Practitioner Training is now available through St. Stephen’s College, University of Alberta Campus
    Starting in September 2013, Self Regulation Therapy Practitioner training can receive academic...
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Brain Facts

Dissociation has its roots in the brain’s opiod system which secretes endorphins to blunt strong painful feelings. Opiods are the body’s narcotics and act to numb feelings, along with which people feel a sense of depersonalization and derealization.
Early trauma and/or attachment disruptions affect our ability to slow down, self soothe, and regulate affect.
Physical symptoms of dysregulation include insomnia, asthma, allergies, migraines, tinnitis, hyperacousis, photophobia, neck and back pain, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, autoimmune diseases, gastrointestinal difficulties, temporal mandibular joint dysfunction, alcohol and drug abuse.